TDD in typescript

TDD in typescript

Looks like its not seamless: http://visualstudiomagazine.com/articles/2013/06/01/test-driven-development-with-typescript.aspx

SEE: http://joeriks.com/2012/10/12/test-first-development-with-typescript-within-visual-studio/

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/16069416/dependency-injection-in-typescript

using QUnit: http://lordhanson.wordpress.com/2012/10/15/unit-testing-with-typescript-and-resharper/

Testing with Jasmine:

http://www.nuget.org/packages/jasmine.TypeScript.DefinitelyTyped/

http://blorkfish.wordpress.com/2012/10/06/typescript-unit-testing-with-visual-studio-2012-jasmine-backbone-sinon-require-and-testem-on-windows-7/

UNIT TESTING: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/12695934/unittesting-in-typescript

tsUnit – TypeScript Unit Testing Framework

NOTE: Add ref file for intellisense

Eg.

/// <reference path=”node.d.ts” />

/// <reference path=”jasmine.d.ts” />

polyglot programming

http://polyglotprogramming.com/

Polyglot Programming1 is a website dedicated to exploring the benefits (and drawbacks) of combining multiple programming languages and multiple “modularity paradigms” in application development. The “paradigms” include Functional Programming, Object-Oriented Programming, and Aspect-Oriented Programming.

http://polyglotprogramming.com/papers/HowFPChangesDevPractices.pdf

http://polyglotprogramming.com/papers/PolyglotPolyParadigm.pdf

 

System programming and Application programming

System programming and Application programming

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Systems_programming

System programming (or systems programming) is the activity of computer programming system software. The primary distinguishing characteristic of systems programming when compared to application programming is thatapplication programming aims to produce software which provides services to the user (e.g. word processor), whereas systems programming aims to produce software which provides services to the computer hardware (e.g. disk defragmenter). It requires a greater degree of hardware awareness.

Metaprogramming

 

Metaprogramming is the writing of computer programs that write or manipulate other programs (or themselves) as their data, or that do part of the work at compile time that would otherwise be done at runtime. In some cases, this allows programmers to minimize the number of lines of code to express a solution (hence reducing development time), or it gives programs greater flexibility to efficiently handle new situations without recompilation.

The language in which the metaprogram is written is called the metalanguage. The language of the programs that are manipulated is called the object language. The ability of a programming language to be its own metalanguage is calledreflection or reflexivity.

Reflection is a valuable language feature to facilitate metaprogramming. Having the programming language itself as a first-class data type (as in LispForth or Rebol) is also very useful; this is known as “homoiconicity“. Generic programming invokes a metaprogramming facility within a language, in those languages supporting it.

Metaprogramming usually works in one of three ways[citation needed]. The first way is to expose the internals of the run-time engine to the programming code through application programming interfaces (APIs). The second approach is dynamic execution of expressions that contain programming commands, often composed from strings, but can also be from other methods using arguments and/or context.[1] Thus, “programs can write programs.” Although both approaches can be used in the same language, most languages tend to lean toward one or the other.

The third way is to step outside the language entirely. General purpose program transformation systems, which accept language descriptions and can carry out arbitrary transformations on those languages, are direct implementations of general metaprogramming. This allows metaprogramming to be applied to virtually any target language without regard to whether that target language has any metaprogramming abilities of its own.

 

Smalltalk

Smalltalk

Smalltalk was the product of research led by Alan Kay at Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC); Alan Kay designed most of the early Smalltalk versions, which Dan Ingalls implemented. The first version, known as Smalltalk-71, was created by Ingalls in a few mornings on a bet that a programming language based on the idea of message passing inspired by Simula could be implemented in “a page of code.”[1] A later variant actually used for research work is now known as Smalltalk-72 and influenced the development of the Actor model. Its syntax and execution model were very different from modern Smalltalk variants.

After significant revisions which froze some aspects of execution semantics to gain performance (by adopting a Simula-like class inheritance model of execution), Smalltalk-76 was created. This system had a development environmentfeaturing most of the now familiar tools, including a class library code browser/editor. Smalltalk-80 added metaclasses, to help maintain the “everything is an object” (except private instance variables) paradigm by associating properties and behavior with individual classes, and even primitives such as integer and boolean values (for example, to support different ways of creating instances).This was supposed to be the first object oriented language.

Smalltalk-80 was the first language variant made available outside of PARC, first as Smalltalk-80 Version 1, given to a small number of firms (Hewlett-PackardApple ComputerTektronix, and DEC) and universities (UC Berkeley) for “peer review” and implementation on their platforms. Later (in 1983) a general availability implementation, known as Smalltalk-80 Version 2, was released as an image (platform-independent file with object definitions) and a virtual machine specification. ANSI Smalltalk has been the standard language reference since 1998.[4]

Influences[edit]

Smalltalk was the first true object-oriented programming language.[8] Smalltalk was also one of the most influential programming languages. Virtually all of the object-oriented languages that came after: Flavors,[9] CLOS, Objective CC++C#Java,[10] Python, Ruby[11] and many others, were all influenced by Smalltalk. Smalltalk was also one of the most popular languages with the Agile MethodsRapid Prototyping, and Software Patterns[12] communities. The highly productive environment provided by Smalltalk platforms made them ideal for rapid, iterative development.

Smalltalk emerged from a larger program of ARPA funded research that in many ways defined the modern world of computing. In addition to Smalltalk working prototypes of things such as hypertext, GUIs, multimedia, the mouse, telepresence, and the Internet were developed by ARPA researchers in the 1960’s.[13][14]Alan Kay (one of the inventors of Smalltalk) also described a tablet computer he called the Dynabook which was essentially a design for an iPad.[15]

Smalltalk environments were often the first to develop what are now common object-oriented software design patterns. One of the most popular is the Model-View-Controller pattern for User Interface design. The MVC pattern enables developers to have multiple consistent views of the same underlying data. It’s ideal for software development environments, where there are various views (e.g., entity-relation, dataflow, object model, etc.) of the same underlying specification. Also, for simulations or games where the underlying model may be viewed from various angles and levels of abstraction.[16]

In addition to the MVC pattern the Smalltalk language and environment were tremendously influential in the history of the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and the What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG) user interface, font editors, and desktop metaphors for UI design. The powerful built-in debugging and object inspection tools that came with Smalltalk environments set the standard for all the Integrated Development Environments, starting with Lisp Machine environments, that came after.[17]

Object-oriented programming[edit]

Main article: Object-oriented programming

As in other object-oriented languages, the central concept in Smalltalk-80 (but not in Smalltalk-72) is that of an object. An object is always an instance of a class. Classes are “blueprints” that describe the properties and behavior of their instances. For example, a GUI’s window class might declare that windows have properties such as the label, the position and whether the window is visible or not. The class might also declare that instances support operations such as opening, closing, moving and hiding. Each particular window object would have its own values of those properties, and each of them would be able to perform operations defined by its class.

A Smalltalk object can do exactly three things:

  1. Hold state (references to other objects).
  2. Receive a message from itself or another object.
  3. In the course of processing a message, send messages to itself or another object.

The state an object holds is always private to that object. Other objects can query or change that state only by sending requests (messages) to the object to do so. Any message can be sent to any object: when a message is received, the receiver determines whether that message is appropriate. Alan Kay has commented that despite the attention given to objects, messaging is the most important concept in Smalltalk: “The big idea is ‘messaging’ — that is what the kernel of Smalltalk/Squeak is all about (and it’s something that was never quite completed in our Xerox PARC phase).”[18]

Smalltalk is a “pure” object-oriented programming language, meaning that, unlike Java and C++, there is no difference between values which are objects and values which are primitive types. In Smalltalk, primitive values such as integers, booleans and characters are also objects, in the sense that they are instances of corresponding classes, and operations on them are invoked by sending messages. A programmer can change or extend (through subclassing) the classes that implement primitive values, so that new behavior can be defined for their instances—for example, to implement new control structures—or even so that their existing behavior will be changed. This fact is summarized in the commonly heard phrase “In Smalltalk everything is an object”, which may be more accurately expressed as “all values are objects”, as variables are not.

Since all values are objects, classes themselves are also objects. Each class is an instance of the metaclass of that class. Metaclasses in turn are also objects, and are all instances of a class called Metaclass. Code blocks are also objects.[19]

Reflection[edit]

Reflection is a term that computer scientists apply to software programs that have the capability to inspect their own structure, for example their parse tree or datatypes of input and output parameters. Reflection was first primarily a feature of interpreted languages such as Smalltalk and Lisp. The fact that statements are interpreted means that the programs have access to information created as they were parsed and can often even modify their own structure.

Reflection is also a feature of having a meta-model as Smalltalk does. The meta-model is the model that describes the language itself and developers can use the meta-model to do things like walk through, examine, and modify the parse tree of an object. Or find all the instances of a certain kind of structure (e.g., all the instances of the Method class in the meta-model).

Smalltalk-80 is a totally reflective system, implemented in Smalltalk-80 itself. Smalltalk-80 provides both structural and computational reflection. Smalltalk is a structurally reflective system whose structure is defined by Smalltalk-80 objects. The classes and methods that define the system are themselves objects and fully part of the system that they help define. The Smalltalk compiler compiles textual source code into method objects, typically instances of CompiledMethod. These get added to classes by storing them in a class’s method dictionary. The part of the class hierarchy that defines classes can add new classes to the system. The system is extended by running Smalltalk-80 code that creates or defines classes and methods. In this way a Smalltalk-80 system is a “living” system, carrying around the ability to extend itself at run time.

Since the classes are themselves objects, they can be asked questions such as “what methods do you implement?” or “what fields/slots/instance variables do you define?”. So objects can easily be inspected, copied, (de)serialized and so on with generic code that applies to any object in the system.[20]

Smalltalk-80 also provides computational reflection, the ability to observe the computational state of the system. In languages derived from the original Smalltalk-80 the current activation of a method is accessible as an object named via a pseudo-variable (one of the six reserved words), thisContext. By sending messages to thisContext a method activation can ask questions like “who sent this message to me”. These facilities make it possible to implement co-routines or Prolog-like back-tracking without modifying the virtual machine. The exception system is implemented using this facility. One of the more interesting uses of this is in the Seaside web framework which relieves the programmer of dealing with the complexity of a Web Browser’s back button by storing continuations for each edited page and switching between them as the user navigates a web site. Programming the web server using Seaside can then be done using a more conventional programming style.[21]

An example of how Smalltalk can use reflection is the mechanism for handling errors. When an object is sent a message that it does not implement, the virtual machine sends the object the doesNotUnderstand: message with a reification of the message as an argument. The message (another object, an instance of Message) contains the selector of the message and an Array of its arguments. In an interactive Smalltalk system the default implementation of doesNotUnderstand: is one that opens an error window (a Notifier) reporting the error to the user. Through this and the reflective facilities the user can examine the context in which the error occurred, redefine the offending code, and continue, all within the system, using Smalltalk-80’s reflective facilities.[22][23]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynabook

This concept was created two years before the founding of Xerox PARC. Kay wanted to make “A Personal Computer For Children Of All Ages.” The ideas led to the development of the Xerox Alto prototype, which was originally called “the interim Dynabook”.[6][7] It embodied all the elements of a graphical user interface, or GUI, as early as 1972. The software component of this research was Smalltalk, which went on to have a life of its own independent of the Dynabook concept.

Kay wanted the Dynabook concept to embody the learning theories of Jerome Bruner and some of what Seymour Papert— who had studied with developmental psychologist Jean Piaget and who was one of the inventors of the Logo programming language — was proposing.

 

Assembly Language

Assembly Language

An assembly language is a low-level programming language for a computer, or other programmable device, in which there is a very strong (generally one-to-one) correspondence between the language and the architecture’s machine codeinstructions. Each assembly language is specific to a particular computer architecture, in contrast to most high-level programming languages, which are generally portable across multiple architectures, but require interpreting or compiling.

Assembly language is converted into executable machine code by a utility program referred to as an assembler; the conversion process is referred to as assembly, or assembling the code.

Assembly language uses a mnemonic to represent each low-level machine operation or opcode. Some opcodes require one or more operands as part of the instruction, and most assemblers can take labels and symbols as operands to represent addresses and constants, instead of hard coding them into the program. Macro assemblers include a macroinstruction facility so that assembly language text can be pre-assigned to a name, and that name can be used to insert the text into other code. Many assemblers offer additional mechanisms to facilitate program development, to control the assembly process, and to aid debugging.

 

Assembler[edit]

An assembler creates object code by translating assembly instruction mnemonics into opcodes, and by resolving symbolic names for memory locations and other entities.[1] The use of symbolic references is a key feature of assemblers, saving tedious calculations and manual address updates after program modifications. Most assemblers also include macro facilities for performing textual substitution—e.g., to generate common short sequences of instructions as inline, instead of called subroutines.

Assemblers have been available since the 1950s and are far simpler to write than compilers for high-level languages as each mnemonic instruction / address mode combination translates directly into a single machine language opcode. Modern assemblers, especially for RISCarchitectures, such as SPARC or Power Architecture, as well as x86 and x86-64, optimize instruction scheduling to exploit the CPU pipeline efficiently.[citation needed]

Number of passes[edit]

There are two types of assemblers based on how many passes through the source are needed to produce the executable program.

  • One-pass assemblers go through the source code once. Any symbol used before it is defined will require “errata” at the end of the object code (or, at least, no earlier than the point where the symbol is defined) telling the linker or the loader to “go back” and overwrite a placeholder which had been left where the as yet undefined symbol was used.
  • Multi-pass assemblers create a table with all symbols and their values in the first passes, then use the table in later passes to generate code.

In both cases, the assembler must be able to determine the size of each instruction on the initial passes in order to calculate the addresses of subsequent symbols. This means that if the size of an operation referring to an operand defined later depends on the type or distance of the operand, the assembler will make a pessimistic estimate when first encountering the operation, and if necessary pad it with one or more “no-operation” instructions in a later pass or the errata. In an assembler with peephole optimization, addresses may be recalculated between passes to allow replacing pessimistic code with code tailored to the exact distance from the target.

The original reason for the use of one-pass assemblers was speed of assembly— often a second pass would require rewinding and rereading a tape or rereading a deck of cards. With modern computers this has ceased to be an issue. The advantage of the multi-pass assembler is that the absence of errata makes the linking process (or the program load if the assembler directly produces executable code) faster.[2]

High-level assemblers[edit]

More sophisticated high-level assemblers provide language abstractions such as:

See Language design below for more details.

Transforming assembly language into machine code is the job of an assembler, and the reverse can at least partially be achieved by a disassembler. Unlike high-level languages, there is usually a one-to-one correspondence between simple assembly statements and machine language instructions. However, in some cases, an assembler may provide pseudoinstructions (essentially macros) which expand into several machine language instructions to provide commonly needed functionality. For example, for a machine that lacks a “branch if greater or equal” instruction, an assembler may provide a pseudoinstruction that expands to the machine’s “set if less than” and “branch if zero (on the result of the set instruction)”. Most full-featured assemblers also provide a rich macro language (discussed below) which is used by vendors and programmers to generate more complex code and data sequences.

Each computer architecture has its own machine language. Computers differ in the number and type of operations they support, in the different sizes and numbers of registers, and in the representations of data in storage. While most general-purpose computers are able to carry out essentially the same functionality, the ways they do so differ; the corresponding assembly languages reflect these differences.

Multiple sets of mnemonics or assembly-language syntax may exist for a single instruction set, typically instantiated in different assembler programs. In these cases, the most popular one is usually that supplied by the manufacturer and used in its documentation.

Language design[edit]

Basic elements[edit]

There is a large degree of diversity in the way the authors of assemblers categorize statements and in the nomenclature that they use. In particular, some describe anything other than a machine mnemonic or extended mnemonic as a pseudo-operation (pseudo-op). A typical assembly language consists of 3 types of instruction statements that are used to define program operations:

  • Opcode mnemonics
  • Data sections
  • Assembly directives